Lisbon & Estoril Film Festival

Films

Special Screenings - Special Screenings

Crew:

Screenplay: Ayn Rand, based on her book of the same name, The Fountainhead
Production: Henry Blanke
Cinematography: Robert Burks
Music: Max Steiner

The Fountainhead

A film by King Vidor

Back
The Fountainhead (1949), is the story of an architect and many of the scenes in the film correspond to a contemporary discourse on architecture, and the film presents a very specific, and much discussed, idea of the social role of the architect in society. 

Considered, many years later, as the quintessential film of King Vidor’s work, is an adaptation of the American bestseller of the same name, from writer Ayn Rand, and inspired on the life of the celebrated architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Before starting filming, Vidor studied Wright's work in depth and conceived a full use of his buildings but the financial restrictions made such extravagances impossible, and forced him to use models and stylization. This ended up working out for the best and being one of the strong points of the film. Rarely in cinema has a decor had such a strong presence and, in this case, we can even say it becomes the protagonist. Manhattan’s skyscrapers punctuate Howard Roark’s (Gary Cooper) studio or Wynand’s (R. Massey) newspaper, seen through huge windows.

The film will be presented in a conversation between architect Rudy Ricciotti and Juan Branco, on the theme Building and serving.
  • Cast:

    Gary Cooper, Patricia Neal, Raymond Massey
  • Original Title:

    The Fountainhead
  • Country:

    United States of America
  • Year:

    1949
  • 114' EN, Subtitles: PT, 35mm

Crew:

Screenplay: Ayn Rand, based on her book of the same name, The Fountainhead
Production: Henry Blanke
Cinematography: Robert Burks
Music: Max Steiner

Schedule

Medeia Nimas Cinema

Rudy Ricciotti in conversation with Juan Branco e Paulo Branco
6€

Director

King Vidor

King Wallis Vidor (February 8th 1894 - November 1th 1982)  was an American film director, producer and screenwriter whose career spanned nearly seven decades. His films from the 1920s and 1930s were amongst the most creative, both in content and theme, of those produced in Hollywood; they deal in relatively uncompromising terms with such themes as idealism and disillusionment in contemporary life.

Among his most admired works we can find The Big Parade (1925), Hallelujah (1929), The Champ (1931), Stella Dallas (1937), The Citadel (1938) and The Fountainhead (1949).

King Vidor was nominated five times for the Academy Award for Best Director, and won eight international film awards during his career. In 1979 he was awarded an Honorary Academy Award for his “incomparable achievements as a cinematic creator and innovator”.
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